Product Talks Brisbane

meet up brisbane

Join me and the Brisbane product community as we debate and discuss the role of gender in product management.

Guest Presentation: Does Gender Play a Role in Product Management?

Thursday, Jun 2, 2016, 5:45 PM

everydayhero office
Level 8, 333 Ann St Brisbane, AU

19 Product People Attending

The 2016 Pragmatic Marketing Global Product Management survey found that 63% of product managers are male, increasing to 79% for more senior product roles.While gender equity issues persist within corporate Australia more generally, in a role where stakeholder influence and the ability to manage across multiple domains is critical, what role does …

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Yours Productly – Jobs To Be Done

job-to-be-done

JTBD takes the focus away from feature sets. Instead the core focus moves to understanding what it that the product is solving for; the customer need; the job the customers are going to use the product for and how to solve for that.

Want to know more about the Jobs to Be Done framework?

Visit Yours Productly and listen to Ravi Kumar and I discuss the key concepts and how #JTBD can be applied in product development.

The product managers’ bookshelf

read-bookshelf

Looking for your next product management read? Check out the latest additions to ‘hit’ the Product Managers’ Bookshelf.

Happy reading!

 

Women in Design: How to Trust Yourself

design fund

Reposted from the fifth Women in Design event on the 19th of April 2016.

“Female voices, she argued, are underrepresented in professional settings, from entry-level positions to the C-suite. But when women become more visible, they’re subject to extra criticism and backlash, whether they’re simply sharing their talents or pitching their voices into more charged discussions like negotiating salaries,raising venture capital, and speaking out against sexism.” – Maria Molfino

Some common themes to those discussed at the Sydney Product Talks session on the role of gender in product management.

Wonderful advice from this panel discussion at the Designer FundHappy reading: How to Trust Yourself: Insights from 6 Top Women Leaders in Design & Tech

Does Gender Play a Role in Product Management?

diversity

Last night I led a discussion at the Product Talks Sydney in relation to the role of gender in product management.

One of the reasons I started thatproductchick was because, as a woman in product management, I felt disconnected from much of the product management discussion and representation. When you search for “product manager” online, for example, overwhelmingly the imagery and language is male.

In my product management career to date, I have encountered both overt and implicit gender bias. With experience (and many mistakes!), I have learned how to be effective and overcome these challenges. As with any implicit behaviour however, they are difficult to identify, navigate and ultimately change. (Any product manager who has explored the role of behavioural economics in service and product design will know how powerful implicit belief systems are.)

Below is a brief excerpt from last night’s presentation, outlining things product managers and leaders can do to to address gender bias and make the product community reflective of the community in which our products and services thrive:

  • Don’t hold yourself back – work outside your comfort zone and take the opportunities that come your way
  • Be explicit about your career aspirations and choices. Ask for and participate in professional development and training
  • Keep real-time records – objective metrics and compliments that you can use in your performance conversation and be prepared substantiate and highlight your achievements
  • Don’t undermine yourself – be quietly confident
  • Watch out for being unfairly assigned ‘office housework’. Be strategic about what you say yes to and what you say no to
  • Know your product portfolio financials and metrics – metrics are hard to argue against; they build your credentials and can bridge divides based on stereotypes or biases
  • Actively engage stakeholders early and frequently – even the tough ones.
  • As a product leader (both women and men), actively hire for diversity and inclusion. Be conscious of your inherent bias.
  • Support your team to work across (and up) your organisational structure

A big shout out to Adrienne and Nick from Brainmates for hosting last night’s event.

You can download a full copy of the presentation: Does Gender Play A Role In Product Management V3.7

 

MYOB DevelopHER internship

Great opportunity for a paid internship via MYOB to develop women into Devs. No previous tech background required. Email: DevelopHER@myob.com

developher

Don’t confuse a Minimum Viable Product (MVP) with a Go-To-Market shortcut

minimum viable product shortcut

As a Product Manager I am often working towards the launch and development of an MVP – Minimum Viable Product. An MVP is a great means to launch quickly and effectively in market; to test and learn, iterate and refine. It should not, however be confused with a go-to-market short cut.

In developing an MVP you can’t negate good product management disciplines:

  • Know what market or customer problem you are solving for – what is the job to be done?
  • What does success look like? How will you measure success – unit sales; conversion; customer satisfaction; utilisation. Make sure that you have defined measures which are actionable. If you can’t do anything against your measures then they are worthless.
  • An MVP does not mean you don’t have to take care in both product and user experience design. Test your MVP before you take it to market. I like to do this across a number of iterations and/or channels; internally, online and with real, live prospects/customers.
  • Engage the business. Make sure that your key stakeholders across the business understand the value your proposition will deliver and their respective roles in testing, iterating and embedding it in market.

Lastly, make sure you have a well defined exit strategy. Hopefully your MVP has been strategically developed against a set of core business objectives. However, if for some reason you take it to market and it fails, you need to know when to pivot, when to refine and when to exit.